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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
with that being a miserable term nap's what barack obama was talking about when he said overreach. >> james, i'm curious about potential powder kegs here. without thinking about things like natural disasters that could come along, what are things that you see as potentially plaguing this second term? does the arab spring and some negative fallout from that terrorism, anything else just -- >> bypass the natural disaster piece so quickly because i think that climb change is something that is not as random as we think it is. so this administration, because i think it owes it to the folk who put them in place, has to be knowledgeable about how our environment is going to unfold in the next several years. you can hedge against some of the natural disaster, one making sure fema is on point, two addressing climate change, the root cause. when you look at the arab spring and the middle east, that's a complicated issue. part of what we're dealing with here is when you're leader of the free world for four years you have four years to deal with a lot of different crises. when you're in for eight years, t
. >>> president obama as we've been talking about will start his second term on monday. and we will take a look at what to expect, what you can expect in the next four years. ass customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? >>> welcome back, everyone, to "cnn saturday morning." here in washington, crowds are already gathering for what is going to be an action-packed inauguration weekend. the president's public swearing-in and inaugural speech take place monday. the festivities certainly well underway here on the mall. you see the crowds are gathering there. suzanne malveaux is covering some of the events. sthooes nation she's at the national day of service. what's going on there? >> reporter: randi, you kn
. it's what president obama was talking about when he dedicated the king memorial in 2011. >> progress was hard. progress was purchased through enduring the smack of billy clubs and the blast of fire hoses. nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work is not yet complete. >> back in dr. king's day voter suppression was enforced by fire hoses and billy clubs. today it's more subtle. but just as dangerous. rnc chairman reince priebus is arguing to change the rules in their state for how they award in presidential elections. you should this kind of plan. might have won the white house last year, not barack obama. priebus says quote, it's something a lot of states have been consistently blue that are fully controlled red ought to be looking at. priebus supports this now
of history of the presidency of barack obama. everyone talks about how in the second term, presidents run for history. this is that first kind of draft, isn't it? >> some ways that's a dangerous concept. think about it, all of a sudden you're playing to the academic jury, that's the ultimate electorate, the people who will decide if you're a near great president or average president, you know, whether you're a teddy roosevelt or a chester arthur, and you probably shouldn't be playing to them more than any other particular interest group. i'm part of the jury. see, you only get to vote for president once are we get to vote over and over again. but presidents really, it seems to me, that's just one more interest group they should avoid tailoring their actions. >> we talk about second it terms a lot. how presidents can avoid the pitfalls that's plagued so many during the second term. >> i don't think there's a second term curse. a number of factors including the media, the 24/7 news cycle, the saturation coverage, everything that a president does or says or that his family does or says. >> i
to wanting to talk about the art the obama's brought into the white house. if we are meant to be still and reflect on it, let's reflect. one is the bust of martin luther king jr. that is there in the oval office. tell us about that. >> that is made by the artist charles alston, my great uncle. when obama came into office, a few days later, he removed winston churchhill and brought in this one. he has lincoln and king. on this weekend, in particular, that resonance is just perfect. >> there's another king moment in terms of art. the "i am a man" part of the memphis sanitation workers strike when dr. king was assassinated. talk to me about that piece. >> it's a text painting by an artist who works with just like that sign that we know so well from the iconic protests. he transforms that into art recognizing that we look at language as a visual thing as well when we take in art. the past is refigured in the present moment. we bring forward the king moment. more importantly, as you mentioned, the memphis sanitation workers strike moment thinking of how we got to where we are. >> it says la
's an obama hat. >> i'm going to talk to your brother. you know what the hat's all about, you've got a button as well. tell me what it was like last go-round. >> it was special, it was emotional. because most people can't come. so i'm very blessed to at least come to see the president. >> that is so nice. and you came all the way from california, is that right? >> yes, ma'am. >> and what do you hope the president learns, what do you want the president to know? >> everything that he can. >> everything that he can. everything that he wants to know about. about the family. >> no guns at school. >> all right we got a message from one of the kids, no guns at school. soledad, we'll give it back to you, a lot of folks want to weigh in here, it's just a gorgeous day and they're very excited about tomorrow. >> and it's nice to see all the big crowds that are growing steadily. all right suzanne malveaux, thanks. >>> barack obama's public swearing in ceremony tomorrow is going to coincide with another important event, the national observance of martin luther king jr.'s birthday. >> earlier 25today, pres
's take a listen to president obama in his own words back in february of 2009 talking about iraq. [video clip] >> a candidate for president, i made clear a time line 16 months to carry out the drug them while pledging to consult closely with our military commanders upon taking office to ensure that we preserve the gains we have made and to protect our troops. these consultations are now complete. i have chosen a time line that will remove our combat brigades over the next 18 months. let me say this as plainly as i can -- by august 31, 2010, our combat mission in iraq will end. host: that as president obama back in february, 2009. guest: that is a promise kept this was the centerpiece of his campaign. you can go back to 2003 with his opposition to the war. a promise that week raided was barack obama will work with military commanders on the ground in iraq to end the war safely and responsibly within 16 months and we raided that a promise kept in 2010 as the last combat troops were removed from iraq. this gets back to what we were talking about about presidential power. there were things t
will be there tomorrow. host: the promise that dr. king talked about has been fulfilled with the re-election of president obama? guest: i think you can't deny that we made tremendous progress. and the re-election of president obama is another milestone moment in civil rights history. but we still have a long way to go as far as racial reconciliation in america and building what dr. king called "a loving community account. tomorrow, yes, is a milestone moment not only for the president but for america's quest for racial are skillization. host: let's go to a phone call. good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. it's a pleasure to be calling and being on the air. i actually had the privilege when i was 20 years old i was on the executive board of penn state and me and some of the other members of the executive board as well as some of the borders of the k.s.u. did attend the inauguration of president clinton back in 1997. host: what do you remember from that moment? caller: i remember the crowds -- i mean i have never seen a crowd like that in washington, d.c. that was the first time i've been to
. >> president obama of course promised in his first term to take a leadership role on immigration reform. it has been disappointing to many he did not get that moving. he has pledged again to do so. he talked about he wanted to see a bill early on. now he has introduced ideas for gun control. he has another debate over fiscal policy. what does leadership mean in your mind? what to do you want to hear in the state of the union? or is there a better idea something would come from the senate and the president would take a support role? >> it is a good question. part of the problem -- the answer is not another great speech about immigration reform. we need action. this is what happens when immigration reform is important but it is not the number one issue. you can keep on telling it the could you have to take care of the fiscal cliff, which will -- looks like it will go all the way to the end of that term. i do not think it's going to be over soon. guns, i think that has surpassed immigration reform on priorities. i'm not making a judgment. i'm trying to state some facts. you are right, and this has
is meeting tomorrow. we will talk with two bears, scott smith and stephen benjamin. also bill adair and how president obama is delivering on campaign promises. and jack buckley and tom loveless of the brookings institution. like every day at 7:00 eastern on c-span. -- live every day at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> it was an important period of history. i felt their perspective should be brought to bear. there has been some other points of the crisis that was not entirely accurate. i thought it was an important for the historical record to present our perspective. i think currently for people to understand there were different policy options, disagreements. if we want to prevent another crisis from happening again, i felt the public needed to engage more on financial reform and educate themselves better and make it an issue with their elected officials. i tried hard to make the book accessible. >> the former head of the fdic, sheila bair on the worst financial crisis since the great depression. &a."y night on c-span's "q the american bankers association predicts weak growth and the prospect of
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)